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26-28 October 2021

Click here for Rockin Reactions photos (26 October)

Click here for Beakers.Bots.Build photos (27 October)

Click here for STEM Unearthed photos (28 October)

 

It’s a scintillating week of science discovery for Roma students this week with the Queensland Minerals and Energy Academy (QMEA), the education arm of the Queensland Resources Council (QRC) in town.

Origin professionals will mentor students through Beakers.Bots.Build and STEM Unearthed workshops while Senex staff will take students on a journey through the rock cycle in Rockin Reactions workshops at St John’s Catholic School.

Origin’s General Manager Reedy Creek Cambabula and Peat Asset, Maceon Cooper said about 50 students from local Roma schools will take part in the Beakers.Bots.Build and STEM Unearthed workshops.

“Students explore the importance of scientific investigation, technology, and engineering as well as critical and creative thinking in the resources sector,” Mr Cooper said.

“These workshops help the students see how classroom work relates to some of the activities carried out every day on Origin’s APLNG worksites, and by talking to our volunteers, students get real-life insight into some of the careers we have at Origin.”

Senex’s Community Relations Manager Trevor Robertson said in Rockin’ Reactions, students will explore the formation of rocks through natural processes such as erosion and sedimentation.

“They’ll gain knowledge of careers in geology and exploration directly from professionals in the field, and this can be a powerful catalyst for students to set future career goals.”

St John’s Catholic School Principal Jim Brennan said the workshops also helped students with the vitals skills of collaboration, networking and communication.

“And they also bring the students’ classroom work to life, which can be a very powerful learning tool,” he said.

“It’s particularly valuable that these workshops are aligned to the Australian Curriculum.”

QRC’s Director Skills and Education Katrina-Lee Jones said she hoped the students would be encouraged to consider careers in the resources sector as a result of the workshops.

“There are a great many highly-skilled careers available with us, which are also highly paid and can take them all over the globe,” she said.

“But just as importantly, there are careers that can retain young people in their home communities, which is so important in keeping our regional centres vibrant places to live.”

As Australia’s largest and most successful industry-led education and skills training initiative, the QMEA seeks to broaden student and teacher knowledge of career opportunities in resources.

The academy encourages a talent pipeline of employees into VET and STEM-related careers, with a focus on female and Indigenous participation. The QMEA currently engages with 80 schools and is a partnership between the QRC and the Queensland Government under its Gateway to Industry Schools program.

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